cbabcock@jw.com
+1 713.752.4210

Chip Babcock

First Amendment, Commercial, and Intellectual Property Litigator

Charles “Chip” Babcock is a top First Amendment, trial, and appellate lawyer who has represented a myriad of clients in high-profile litigation trials.

Practice in Play

Charles “Chip” Babcock is a nationally acclaimed First Amendment, commercial, and intellectual property trial and appellate attorney. Over his extensive 30-plus-year career, the seasoned attorney has represented major household names, from media moguls to political defendants to major corporations: including Oprah Winfrey, Dr. Phil, Bill O’Reilly, Warner Brothers, Inc., George W. Bush, Google Inc., and Ericsson Inc. Chip Babcock has won an extraordinary range of precedent-setting cases, including one involving TransAmerican Press that established the First Amendment right of journalists to protect confidential sources.

Chip Babcock’s practice centers on bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, intellectual property litigation, government investigations, media litigation, appellate litigation, and First Amendment litigation.  From the battlegrounds of the courtroom, he has represented a myriad of Fortune 500 clients, tried more than 100 jury cases in federal and state courts, and argued over 50 appeals.

Today, Chip Babcock is a partner at Jackson Walker L.L.P. and a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, American Board of Trial Advocates, the International Academy of Trial Lawyers, the Center for American and International Law, and the Litigation Counsel of America.

He is a graduate of Brown University and Boston University School of Law.

Presidents and the Press

By Chip Babcock

Here’s a quiz for you. Match the President to the quote:

  1. “He uses tweets to go directly to the public while bypassing journalists.”
  2. “[The President] directed [name] to make speeches attacking newspapers and the television networks as if they were rival political parties.
  3. “The lesson he took from his early campaign was that the game was rigged.
  4. “The New York Times is guilty of gross negligence and reporting failures.”
  5. “The news media has a preference for distortion and dissent.”
  6. “I treat journalists as people who [can] be bamboozled, bullied, cajoled or bribed with entertainment.”
  7. “He believes in a free press but when it’s applied to him he’s incredibly thin-skinned. If you cross him he’s a different person. He’ll remember every slight.”

Those of you who voted for Donald Trump (in the quiz I mean) are substantially correct; change a word or two and you are spot on. But how many of you knew that the answer to number one was Barack Obama; number two Richard Nixon who, in 1969, according to The Atlantic in a 2014 article, instructed his Vice President, Spiro Agnew, to go after the “media,” his more sinister sounding phrase for what had been previously referred to by the more friendly First Amendment term “press” as if they were the opposition party; number three was Nixon again commenting about his early campaigns for Congress; number four was George W. Bush through his press secretary Dana Perino; number five was Lyndon Johnson; number six was Johnson again, and number seven was Jimmy Carter, according to his press secretary…Read more.

In his 30-plus years in practice, Chip Babcock has risen as a nationally recognized First Amendment lawyer, representing major media household names on some of the highest-profile, game-changing libel and defamation cases in recent memory.

Commercial and Intellectual Property Litigation

Chip Babcock wins jury verdicts in favor of high-profile clients and offers legal counsel when litigation is not always the answer.

To learn about Chip’s cases across the U.S., touch the colored pins. Click on the pop-up boxes for more information on each trial.
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  • Trial
  • Summary Judgement
  • Dismissal
  • Settlement
  • Other
  • Multiple
1980: Miller v. TransAmerican Press Inc.

Established a precedent allowing reporters to protect confidential sources as part of their First Amendment privileges.

1998: Served as the lead attorney for Oprah Winfrey

Successfully defending her when she was sued by a group of cattlemen from Amarillo, Texas who believed that an episode of her show about mad cow disease violated the False Disparagement of Perishable Food Products Act.

1999: Successfully defended Amway in a civil lawsuit filed by Procter & Gamble

Alleging that Amway violated the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act.